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PAUSE Fashion Film: Defenders of the Faith

Before Kanye was rapping about Ralph Lauren and way before A$AP Rocky had anything to do with Rick Owens, Jamaican-born DJ Kool Herc was busy creating a small subculture in The Bronx, New York city. Later on, that subculture would come to be known as Hip Hop.

Run-DMC At Montreux

Soon, hip hop was no longer considered a musical secret between the people of New York. Before the world knew it, they were being hit left, right and centre with this strange new genre of music and lifestyle.

It is difficult to pinpoint hip hop as just a music genre, when there’s so much more to it, especially in terms of fashion. The first time we saw the two industries really merge, and when branding got involved, was when Run DMC stepped into the game with their iconic Adidas tracksuits and trainers. Along with their hats and heavy gold chains, Run DMC created an image for themselves that would forever be associated with their music.

Soon, every rap artist or crew had their own personalised ‘look’. N.W.A were rarely seen without their caps and MC Hammer’s pants still pop back into trend every now and again.

hip hop 2One similar theme throughout though was the baggy clothing. Oversized t-shirts and hoodies will always be associated with hip hop, even if the silhouette has changed slightly this past decade thanks to the influence of rap trendsetters like Andre 3000, Kanye West and Pharrell Williams.

But hip hop isn’t about the clothing; it’s not even just about the music. Hip hop is a culture. Whilst Kool Herc was mixing funk and disco with reggae on the decks, hip hop lovers on the streets of New York were breakdancing to it, and soon graffiti and tagging also became a major part of the culture, as well as beatboxing and of course rapping.

hip hop 5

hip hop 3

It makes sense that something that started off in the streets, would end up influencing street style as much as it does, even if it has evolved into a gigantic business. Fashion labels started up by the likes of Russel Simmons and Jay-Z paved the way for young emerging artists to start-up their own endorsements.

Of course the day old debate over whether street style influences catwalk or vice versa doesn’t just apply to hip hop. Many designers have been influenced by subcultures that were started on the street, from Vivienne Westwood and punk to Marc Jacobs and grunge.

hip hop 6

hip hop 4

hip hop 7

It does go both ways however. The influence of hip hop isn’t difficult to see on the streets. Although it’s still young and growing, it is now an industry and therefore it advertises to the public and uses endorsements. Although some artists have forgotten the humbling roots of the culture, many rappers still deliver the positive message that Kool Herc first intended hip hop to be about.

Words: Ernela Vukaj


Before Kanye was rapping about Ralph Lauren and way before A$AP Rocky had anything to do with Rick Owens, Jamaican-born DJ Kool Herc was busy creating a small subculture in The Bronx, New York city. Later on, that subculture would come to be known as Hip Hop.

Run-DMC At Montreux

Soon, hip hop was no longer considered a musical secret between the people of New York. Before the world knew it, they were being hit left, right and centre with this strange new genre of music and lifestyle.

It is difficult to pinpoint hip hop as just a music genre, when there’s so much more to it, especially in terms of fashion. The first time we saw the two industries really merge, and when branding got involved, was when Run DMC stepped into the game with their iconic Adidas tracksuits and trainers. Along with their hats and heavy gold chains, Run DMC created an image for themselves that would forever be associated with their music.

Soon, every rap artist or crew had their own personalised ‘look’. N.W.A were rarely seen without their caps and MC Hammer’s pants still pop back into trend every now and again.

hip hop 2One similar theme throughout though was the baggy clothing. Oversized t-shirts and hoodies will always be associated with hip hop, even if the silhouette has changed slightly this past decade thanks to the influence of rap trendsetters like Andre 3000, Kanye West and Pharrell Williams.

But hip hop isn’t about the clothing; it’s not even just about the music. Hip hop is a culture. Whilst Kool Herc was mixing funk and disco with reggae on the decks, hip hop lovers on the streets of New York were breakdancing to it, and soon graffiti and tagging also became a major part of the culture, as well as beatboxing and of course rapping.

hip hop 5

hip hop 3

It makes sense that something that started off in the streets, would end up influencing street style as much as it does, even if it has evolved into a gigantic business. Fashion labels started up by the likes of Russel Simmons and Jay-Z paved the way for young emerging artists to start-up their own endorsements.

Of course the day old debate over whether street style influences catwalk or vice versa doesn’t just apply to hip hop. Many designers have been influenced by subcultures that were started on the street, from Vivienne Westwood and punk to Marc Jacobs and grunge.

hip hop 6

hip hop 4

hip hop 7

It does go both ways however. The influence of hip hop isn’t difficult to see on the streets. Although it’s still young and growing, it is now an industry and therefore it advertises to the public and uses endorsements. Although some artists have forgotten the humbling roots of the culture, many rappers still deliver the positive message that Kool Herc first intended hip hop to be about.

Words: Ernela Vukaj


Come rain or shine, we had a feeling the PAUSE followers and supporters would turn up at our PAUSE Pop Up Launch yesterday night and we weren’t disappointed. With a fashionable crowd, a cool atmosphere and drinks flowing – the night was bound to be a success.

image_00011 IMG_5725 IMG_5713 image_00013

The room was nicely packed with brands showcasing a variety of diverse fashion across the room: Vinti Andrews, AMH, Stanley Kane, Nicce London, Hubert & Calvin, Mr GUGU & Miss Go, Jelly & Cream, Anchor Sunglasses, Malmo Clothing, Zimzilla & Clime-it Brothers – a few brands had exclusive drops on the night as well as some discounts.

On the night we gave away over £500 worth of clothing via a raffle competition which was won by Monsieur Jones. We also gave away a free Voz Vodka bottle on the night too, won by the stylist Zhana Medvesh from our Defenders of the Faith fashion film. To top the night there was FREE drinks all night from Sassy Drinks, Voz Vodka, Tatratea who were providing cocktails and Afflux Energy – plus Propercorn for our VIP & Press guests.

IMG_5731 IMG_5734
IMG_5817

Live performances came from the young and soulful Rebecca King, beatboxing wizard Ben (R-Tizt) Francis and the warm acoustic sounds of Akua Konamah who grabbed the entire rooms attention with their talents. The fashion films were also debuted on the night to a great response.

IMG_5745
IMG_5743

BENM9712 BENM9723 BENM9735 BENM9738
BENM9741(Rebecca King & Ben (R-Tizt) Francis photos by Benjamin Glean)

image_00015
image_00014
IMG_5728IMG_5726
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Overall, the night was a great success thanks to everyone who came out and supported despite the bad weather. The team at PAUSE would like to thank you all for coming out and making it a night to remember. If you couldn’t make it and feel like you’ve missed out, you can still check out our new Fashion Films here.

STREET STYLE SHOTS: Shot by Lewis Roman

RED CARPET PHOTOS: Shot by Dylan Myers

Words: Kacion Mayers

Photos by:
Lewis Roman
Dylan Myers
Benjamin Glean


Before Kanye was rapping about Ralph Lauren and way before A$AP Rocky had anything to do with Rick Owens, Jamaican-born DJ Kool Herc was busy creating a small subculture in The Bronx, New York city. Later on, that subculture would come to be known as Hip Hop.

Run-DMC At Montreux

Soon, hip hop was no longer considered a musical secret between the people of New York. Before the world knew it, they were being hit left, right and centre with this strange new genre of music and lifestyle.

It is difficult to pinpoint hip hop as just a music genre, when there’s so much more to it, especially in terms of fashion. The first time we saw the two industries really merge, and when branding got involved, was when Run DMC stepped into the game with their iconic Adidas tracksuits and trainers. Along with their hats and heavy gold chains, Run DMC created an image for themselves that would forever be associated with their music.

Soon, every rap artist or crew had their own personalised ‘look’. N.W.A were rarely seen without their caps and MC Hammer’s pants still pop back into trend every now and again.

hip hop 2One similar theme throughout though was the baggy clothing. Oversized t-shirts and hoodies will always be associated with hip hop, even if the silhouette has changed slightly this past decade thanks to the influence of rap trendsetters like Andre 3000, Kanye West and Pharrell Williams.

But hip hop isn’t about the clothing; it’s not even just about the music. Hip hop is a culture. Whilst Kool Herc was mixing funk and disco with reggae on the decks, hip hop lovers on the streets of New York were breakdancing to it, and soon graffiti and tagging also became a major part of the culture, as well as beatboxing and of course rapping.

hip hop 5

hip hop 3

It makes sense that something that started off in the streets, would end up influencing street style as much as it does, even if it has evolved into a gigantic business. Fashion labels started up by the likes of Russel Simmons and Jay-Z paved the way for young emerging artists to start-up their own endorsements.

Of course the day old debate over whether street style influences catwalk or vice versa doesn’t just apply to hip hop. Many designers have been influenced by subcultures that were started on the street, from Vivienne Westwood and punk to Marc Jacobs and grunge.

hip hop 6

hip hop 4

hip hop 7

It does go both ways however. The influence of hip hop isn’t difficult to see on the streets. Although it’s still young and growing, it is now an industry and therefore it advertises to the public and uses endorsements. Although some artists have forgotten the humbling roots of the culture, many rappers still deliver the positive message that Kool Herc first intended hip hop to be about.

Words: Ernela Vukaj


Come rain or shine, we had a feeling the PAUSE followers and supporters would turn up at our PAUSE Pop Up Launch yesterday night and we weren’t disappointed. With a fashionable crowd, a cool atmosphere and drinks flowing – the night was bound to be a success.

image_00011 IMG_5725 IMG_5713 image_00013

The room was nicely packed with brands showcasing a variety of diverse fashion across the room: Vinti Andrews, AMH, Stanley Kane, Nicce London, Hubert & Calvin, Mr GUGU & Miss Go, Jelly & Cream, Anchor Sunglasses, Malmo Clothing, Zimzilla & Clime-it Brothers – a few brands had exclusive drops on the night as well as some discounts.

On the night we gave away over £500 worth of clothing via a raffle competition which was won by Monsieur Jones. We also gave away a free Voz Vodka bottle on the night too, won by the stylist Zhana Medvesh from our Defenders of the Faith fashion film. To top the night there was FREE drinks all night from Sassy Drinks, Voz Vodka, Tatratea who were providing cocktails and Afflux Energy – plus Propercorn for our VIP & Press guests.

IMG_5731 IMG_5734
IMG_5817

Live performances came from the young and soulful Rebecca King, beatboxing wizard Ben (R-Tizt) Francis and the warm acoustic sounds of Akua Konamah who grabbed the entire rooms attention with their talents. The fashion films were also debuted on the night to a great response.

IMG_5745
IMG_5743

BENM9712 BENM9723 BENM9735 BENM9738
BENM9741(Rebecca King & Ben (R-Tizt) Francis photos by Benjamin Glean)

image_00015
image_00014
IMG_5728IMG_5726
image_00012

Overall, the night was a great success thanks to everyone who came out and supported despite the bad weather. The team at PAUSE would like to thank you all for coming out and making it a night to remember. If you couldn’t make it and feel like you’ve missed out, you can still check out our new Fashion Films here.

STREET STYLE SHOTS: Shot by Lewis Roman

RED CARPET PHOTOS: Shot by Dylan Myers

Words: Kacion Mayers

Photos by:
Lewis Roman
Dylan Myers
Benjamin Glean


Videographer: Alexandra Mason
Photographer: Kyle Galvin
Stylist: Zhana Medvesh
Models: Bash Sanchez, Ben Easton & Serghinio Wooter @ Models 1

SEE FULL PHOTOSHOOT HERE: